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The advantages of an all-girls’ school education are clear.
Girls’ schools provide an environment that gives every girl an opportunity to showcase her emerging intellect and talents. The experience allows girls to explore and nurture their passions and potential. At OLP, girls are encouraged to become the innovators and leaders of tomorrow.

In a single-sex school, a girl can comprehend her value and her capabilities in ways that have nothing to do with how she looks or whom she dates. She can be free to experiment and explore, trying out new things and trying on new roles. She can follow her ambitions without wasting a second thought or a backward glance on how her male counterparts might perceive her.
~National Coalition of Girls' Schools

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Contrary to the claim that girls’ schools do not prepare girls for the “real world,” research continues to validate and quantify the advantages of single-sex education for girls. These advantages include higher test scores, superior reading, advanced writing and science skills, higher numbers of math and science college majors, higher numbers of doctorates, and higher numbers of graduates who pursue careers in math, science, and technology. Young women leave girls’ schools with the tools and confidence necessary for academic and personal success in college and beyond. University professors say they always identify a girls' school graduate for her confidence and assertiveness.

Quick Facts

  • 93% of girls' school graduates are very or extremely satisfied with their school's ability to provide individualized attention
  • Girls' school graduates are six times more likely to consider majoring in math, science, and technology compared to girls who attend co-ed schools
  • More than 80% of girls' school graduates consider their academic performance highly successful
  • Girls' school graduates are more than twice as likely to earn a doctoral degree compared to girls who attend co-ed schools

The Girls' School Advantage: By the Numbers

“Single-sex graduates exhibited higher levels of self-confidence than female students from coeducational schools. This is true for many aspects of self-confidence, including academic ability, intellectual ability, writing ability, and public speaking ability. It was especially true when it came to confidence in their mathematical and computer skills.”
~Linda J. Sax, Ph.D., UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies


Need more information? Visit the National Coalition of Girls' Schools website.

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